Easy to install containerized application with no additional hardware required

Industrial automation’s edge devices are vulnerable, especially in manufacturing. Hackers exploit connected endpoints to disrupt operations or access networks, causing costly ransomware downtimes. Operators struggle to manage multiple machines, alarms, failures, and maintenance.
Trustcore’s solution monitors edge device data using advanced Machine Learning to detect cyber-attacks and machine failures in real time. Operators are notified instantly and provided root cause analysis to enable efficient troubleshooting and problem resolution.

Detect anomalies instantly on IIoT devices

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With the increase in industrial automation hackers are using this an opportunity for attacks. An attack may result in severe financial damages, loss of reputation, and breach of confidential information, just to name a few. What are the attack vectors in the IIoT market?

  • The IIoT device is used as a window into the industrial enterprise network and database enabling a hacker to corrupt and seize control of the heart of the corporation.
  • The hacker attacks the IIoT device causing it to malfunction or stop functioning altogether.
  • Control of the IIoT device is seized and turned into a BOT to mount Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks against other industrial enterprises.
  • Identify & Respond to Advance Threats

  • Secure Remote Employees & Workers

  • Secure & Manage Devices

  • Secure & Manage Cloud Security

  • REAL TIME DETECTION AND ROOT CAUSE

  • ADVANCED MACHINE LEARNING

  • REDUCED LATENCY AT THE EDGE

TRUSTCORE BA

  • Real time behavior analytics and anomaly detection at the Edge

  • Containerized application, easy install, no additional hardware required

  • On or Off Premise

  • Granular visibility

  • Root cause analysis

  • Faster Response time

  • Predictive and Advanced Failure Detection

Smart Buildings

Cyber attackers can gain access to smart buildings through IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things) devices. Smart buildings use a range of connected devices, sensors, and systems to monitor and manage various aspects of building operations, such as heating, ventilation, lighting, and security. While these devices can provide significant benefits, they can also introduce vulnerabilities that attackers can exploit. One common way attackers can gain access to smart buildings is through exploiting unsecured or poorly secured IIoT devices connected to the building's network. For example, attackers may attempt to gain access to the building's HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) system through an insecure thermostat or other connected device. Once inside the network, attackers can move laterally to other systems and devices, potentially gaining control over building operations or accessing sensitive data. To prevent these types of attacks, it's essential to ensure that IIoT devices connected to a smart building's network are properly secured and regularly updated with the latest security patches

Factory Automation

Cyber attackers can access factory OT (Operational Technology) networks through IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things) devices. IIoT devices are designed to connect various machines and devices within a factory or industrial environment to gather data and enable remote monitoring and control. However, these devices can also introduce vulnerabilities that can be exploited by cyber attackers to gain unauthorized access to factory networks. One common way cyber attackers can exploit IIoT devices is through a technique called "credential stuffing," where they use a list of known usernames and passwords to attempt to gain access to an IIoT device. If the device is using a default or weak password, the attacker can gain access and use it as a foothold to pivot to other devices on the factory network. Another way attackers can gain access is through exploiting unpatched vulnerabilities in IIoT devices. Many IIoT devices run on outdated or unpatched software, which can leave them open to known exploits that attackers can use to gain access. To prevent these types of attacks, it's essential to ensure that IIoT devices are properly secured and regularly updated with the latest security patches.

Healthcare

Cyber attackers can access medical devices and records through IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things) devices. The healthcare industry uses a variety of IIoT devices and equipment. However, these devices can also introduce vulnerabilities that can be exploited by cyber attackers to gain unauthorized access to the network. An IV pump, like any other medical device, can be accessed by a cyber attacker through various methods. These include network-based attacks because the IV pumps are connected to hospital networks, which make them vulnerable to network-based attacks. Malware attacks, an attacker can infect the IV pump with malware, such as viruses or worms, through various means, such as phishing emails, malicious websites, or infected USB drives. Physical access, an attacker has physical access to the IV pump, they can directly connect to the device's ports, such as the USB port or the serial port, and execute commands to manipulate the pump's settings. To protect against these attacks, IV pump manufacturers can improve the security of their devices by implementing security features such as encryption, authentication, and access controls.